The Psychology of Landing Pages: Drilling Into The Buyer’s Consciousness

Written by AlexDesigns

Have you ever wondered why some of your landing pages have abysmal conversion rates, while others are killing it with double-digit conversion rates?

There are many different factors that can affect the conversion rate of a landing page, and you’d be amazed that at times, a slight change of color can make a huge difference in conversions.

There are three features that converting landing pages have in common. No, it’s not just about the size or color of the button. It is about the in-depth reasons why people click, think, decide and then act. If you don’t know it yet, Conversion Rate Optimization is really about psychology.

Let’s talk about each of these features and how they are commanded by “buyer psychology” that makes people click…and buy.

Clear, Obvious, and Compelling

People buy what they know. A website visitor clicks only because he already knows about what has come before, and has a curiosity and anticipation of what will come next. To win the customer, your landing page must have a clear and obvious message for the user. You don’t need to make it clever, cool or cute. You just need to make everything obvious.

What should you make clear?

The user should know what the page is all about, so tell the user what the service or the product is.
The user should know what the service or the product does, so explain the benefits, features or advantages of what you are offering.
The user should know what they need to do next, so create a compelling call to action.
How do you make your landing page obvious?

Use an eye-catching headline—yes, the headline should be bold and big. The first thing that should grab the attention of the user is the headline, so consider its size and position.

The message should be clear and strong—the user should comprehend the message of your headline, so it needs to be clear and strong to inform them of what they see and will buy.

Complement the headline with a subheading that clearly explains it—while the headline should be short and concise, you will have room to explain more about the product or service in the subheading.

Use images with purpose—your landing page should have images that explains the significance of the service or product. Don’t just use an image because it looks good, or because it is eye-popping. The image should be relevant, and should reinforce your message and the product itself.

An excellent example is Benchmark—an email marketing software company.

benchmark

The landing page uses relevant imagery that clearly shows what the page is all about. The headline and subheading use concise language that clearly describes the intent of the landing page.

It is important to remember that most users what things simple and clearly spelled out. I am sure that even you feel the same way. You don’t want your users to guess and be confused about the product or the service you are offering. The clearer your landing page is, the more likely that your users will convert.

Exciting, Interesting, and Should Create a Strong Sense of Curiosity

A landing page should be built on the promise of knowing about something, of delivering something to the user. Once the user’s curiosity is piqued, his desire will compel him to click and decide to take action.

No matter what you are selling, this fact holds true:

— You’re selling designer clothes—your call-to-action says “View the Spring 2015 Collection”. The user should be curious about which clothes will she pick for the season.

  • — You’re selling an email marketing software—your CTA says “TRY US FREE”. The user must want to know how Benchmark will help him manage his newsletters and email marketing campaigns.

 

Stirring the curiosity of your user brings conversion optimization to another level and let the users know that they can only get some things if they click on the call-to-action button.

The CTA is the boiling point of every landing page. The user should ask these two questions:

What lies beyond that button?

What’s in it for me?

Your landing page should address these questions with two techniques:

Give enough information so the users will understand what they will get when they click the button. They should have a “little” inkling about the nature of what’s happening next.

Withhold enough information so that their curiosity is sustained, compelling them to click.

Hit a Nerve

One of the most powerful motivators in our lives is PAIN. In fact, the philosopher Epicurus said that man cannot reach complete pleasure unless all the pain is gone.

In sales and marketing, pain is exploited. When a nerve is hit, a person can be motivated to take action. And that’s exactly what you want a user to do when in your landing page: TAKE ACTION AND CLICK.

To urge them to click, they need to feel a bit of pain. We have to remind them of the lack of comfort they experience in the absence of your service or product.

Tylenol is a literal pain reliever, and their landing page is a perfect example of directly addressing this pain.

tylenol

Notice how they used the phrase “Get Relief”? They also used the word “relief” 3 times, which calls attention to the pain while pointing to the product being the best solution. Users want relief from the pain, so users are more likely to convert. Your landing page just needs to remind the users of the pain, and then with the reminder, the landing page should provide a solution to the pain.

Final Thoughts

There are many other things that can be done to make a highly converting landing page. But it pays to dig deeper into the under-the-surface conversion rate optimization techniques. Remember, it’s all about psychology.