10 Reasons Why The Conversion Rate of Your Landing Page Copy Is An Epic Fail

Written by AlexDesigns

landing-page design for lead generation

So, you bled buckets into writing the perfect landing page copy, edited it until it’s spic and span. Your landing page is perfect, a masterpiece that any marketer would envy. You were pretty sure it would bring you the big bucks…

But wait… you looked at the conversion rates and it was…ABYSMAL! What could have possibly gone wrong?

There are countless ways that a landing page can go wrong, but let’s talk about the top 10 reasons why many seemingly excellent landing pages end up being in the dumps. This list might offer you the insight you need to finally turn matters around:

1. You Do Not Know Your Customer Enough

Understanding the customer is the foremost priority of any marketer. Just how do you expect to sell to a target market that you don’t know anything about? Knowing what your customers want and what motivates them is the key in winning them.  You can’t persuade anyone to take action in your landing page unless you clearly understand exactly what your customers want.

There are 10 things that you need to know about your customers, and those are clearly defined in this excellent Infoentrepreneurs.org article.

So, you need to check the following:

Gather, and stay updated on, the demographics of your market

Tailor your landing page campaigns for different customer streams

Knuckle down and work through the “pain points” of your target audience

know your customer

Of course you will make mistakes along the way, but you need to know the details of who you are selling to. Yes, it will take effort, but, you can be sure that the greater the understanding, the greater the rewards.

2. You’re Missing A Personal Touch

You should conceive of your landing page as the window display of a bricks and mortar retail outlet. The layout of the display is the design of your landing page, while the promotional written material is like your copy.

I don’t know about you, but as a customer, I would like to be treated like a friend. So, the use of a conversational style, whereby you are connecting with people with the words “you” or “we,” will go a long way to increasing the comfort of your prospective customers—trust comes from comfort, and consumer trust leads to sales.

This Tula Software landing page is a good example of a marketing product that speaks to prospects in a friendly, personal manner.

tula

3. Taking Too Long to Make Your Point

You’ve probably been introduced to the playful “K.I.S.S.” concept before—“Keep It Simple Stupid!” The immense value of simplicity when it comes to online marketing should never be underestimated.

Skim-and-scan is the order of the day, and people love short messages with images, so you need to keep your copy brief and to-the-point. Again, this comes back to knowing your customer.

kiss
Tip: Try experimental techniques like split testing to work out what the ideal word count is for your landing page, so that you can not only avoid writing too much, but also making your copy too scant.  BUT!!! There are landing pages with super short messages that has unbelievable impact. Take Optimizely. ‘Nuff said…

short landing page optimizely

 

4. Your Words Are Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious 

Remember that you are not writing a scientific abstract, so use small words that everyone can understand. Make your copy as straightforward and accessible as possible, even if your target market has triple PhDs. Your sole intent is to lead your customers to click that button, not give them a headache.

Simple language that creates an easy consumer experience is a must.

However, if you decide that you need to infuse some color into your copy to appeal to particular segments of your market then go for it! But try not to be too obscure, as you can alienate people.

5. Lengthy Sentences

Just like obscure language and streams of text, overly long sentences mean that your prospects will most likely be turned off your product—so keep your sentences under 12 words.

Short sentences also convey information clearly. Avoid run-on sentences.

You don’t want your potential customer confused because you went on and on and your thoughts were all over the place and you lost the focus of the customer to take action and click your call to action button because you just can’t stop talking about one point but took 125 words in one sentence—pretty much like this one, get my point? 

Tip: Brainstorm what you need to achieve, and then distill your marketing messages by rewriting your copy 5 times to polish the rough edges.

6. You Underestimate the Targeting Power of Bullet Points

The key to ease and simplicity is presenting information in digestible chunks. Again, online users have a really short attention span; we love skimming and scanning. To optimize the conversion of your landing pages, do not forget to use bullet points.

Bullet points are the perfect way to convey:

Benefits

Competitive advantage

Unique selling points

 A perfect example of how solid bullet points are used can be seen from Naomi Dunford and Dave Navarro’s “How to Launch the **** Out of Your Ebook” Landing Page:

 

bullets

7. Your Headline is Vague

Your title needs to engage your visitors in under five seconds. Otherwise, your page won’t convert.

Your headline is like the signage on your street-based store, so it needs to reach out to your audience with a clear message. It is the first thing that people see when they “land” on your landing page.

Make your headline as large as possible, properly positioned at the top of your page. It should show clear, yet compelling promise of what’s in it for the visitor.

A great example is David de Angelo’s Doubleyourdating.com landing page:

doubleyourdating

 

8. You Lost Focus On What Your Landing Page is For—MAKE YOU MONEY

Unlike your blog, a landing page is the pathway for your customers to complete their purchase or sign up to your list. So be sure to keep your sales hat firmly on.

Think of what makes the big players successful:

Nike’s memorable catchphrase, “Just Do It”

The uplifting brand recognition in “Coke is it!”

 9. You’re Not Selling Yourself 

All customers want to know “What’s in it for me?”, and you need to be able to tell them loud and clear. We all want to reap benefits from our purchases, so your landing page needs to succinctly demonstrate how you can make the lives of your buyers better.

For example, you can’t just ask visitors to proceed with something, whether it is a purchase or a sign-up. They need to see what you can offer:

Pain relief

Access to exclusive content

A learning experience for children

 FatCow uses brand-related language to clearly show the benefits of their products in their landing page.

fatcow

10. Is your competitive advantage showing?

Why should someone choose your product or newsletter over your competitors? What makes your product special and worth it? If you are not making the answers to these questions clear, then your landing page is not optimized for conversion.

Final Thoughts

The landing page is an online marketing fundamental, and you need to treat it as such. While writing skills are important, the key lies beyond good grammar—you need to compel your visitors to take that final step with your copywriting prowess. Successfully connect with your audience on a personal and persuasive level, touch their emotions and seduce them with promises that your product/service can keep, leading them to act and click that BUY button.